Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Sangiovese Blends from Tuscany

August 2nd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Sangiovese Blends from Tuscany, for inclusion on our list. Sanguis Jovis, the Latin origin for the varietal name, literally means "blood of Jove" and it is likely that Sangiovese (a.k.a. Sangioveto or San Gioveto) was known by Etruscan winemakers, although the first literary reference to it was in 1722. It is probably indigenous to Tuscany, whose most famous wine is Chianti. The fruit is slow to mature and late-ripening. With relatively thin skins, it has a tendency to rot in dampness and does not mature well if planted above an elevation of 1,500 feet. Sangiovese vineyards with limestone soil seem to produce wines with more forceful aromas. The hot, dry climate, such as Tuscany provides, is where sangiovese thrives. Because these climatic criteria generally enhance quantity, rather than quality, it takes careful cultivation and winemaking techniques to produce really excellent wine from this grape. Sangiovese is the #1 varietal in Italy with 247,000 acres, 10% of the entire wine grape crop. The flavor profile of Sangiovese is fruity, with moderate to high natural acidity and generally a medium-body ranging from firm and elegant to assertive and robust and a finish that can tend towards bitterness. The aroma is generally not as assertive and easily identifiable as Cabernet Sauvignon, for example, but can have a strawberry, blueberry, faintly floral or hearbal, violet or plummy character. The Sangiovese grape is Tuscanys' most prominent grape, however, many different clonal varieties exist, as many towns have their own local version of Sangiovese. Cabernet Sauvignon has been planted in Tuscany for over 250 years, but has only recently become associated with the region due to the rise of the Super Tuscans. Other international varieties found in Tuscany include Cabernet franc, Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc and Syrah. Of the many local red grape varieties Canaiolo, Colorino, Malvasia nera and Mammolo are the most widely planted. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Bruni, Cabernet Sauvignon/Sangiovese 2012
Sangnineto, “Rosso Toscano” 2008
Ruffino, “IL Ducale”, 60%Sangiovese/20% Merlot & 20% Syrah 2010
Brancain, “Tre”, Rosso Toscano 2010
Rocca di Frassinelo, “Ornello” 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Red Zinfandel

August 7th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Red Zinfandel, for inclusion on our list. Robert Boehme of Vermont Wine Merchants Company will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Zinfandel was for many years somewhat of a mystery grape, as far as its origins are concerned. Recent research in Croatia and at the University of California at Davis, using DNA profiling, has proved Zinfandel is a clone of the Croatian variety Crljenak. While it had been theorized that Zinfandel's genetic twin, the Italian Primitivo, was the source, this grape also originally mutated from Crljenak. Zinfandel came to the United States in 1820, when New York nurseryman George Gibbs carried back various cuttings from the Imperial Austrian plant species collection. Over the next two decades, Zinfandel became a popular table grape in the Northeast U.S. Although there are some commercial claims that Agoston Harazsthy brought Zinfandel to California, records show that a Massachusetts nurseryman introduced it there. In either case, Zinfandel is now considered indigenous to California, where it has thrived since the mid-1850's. Because of its vigor, generosity and resistance to vine disease, many zinfandel vineyards exist that are 75 to 100 or more years old. Zinfandel aficionados believe these "old vines" produce the best wines, because the older vineyards set smaller crops and the grapes tend to ripen more evenly. At its best, Zinfandel (red) has a very fruity, raspberry-like aroma and flavor and a "jammy" quality. Zinfandel is one red varietal that is probably best enjoyed in its youth, within three to five years of the vintage. With more bottle age than this, the luscious fruit that distinguishes Zinfandel drops markedly. Zinfandel’s array of stylistic expression makes it amenable to a vast range of foods, from burritos to steak, from burgers to the spiciest of sausages. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

three 3 III, Contra Costa County 2012
Zinsane, Lodi 2012
Sobon Estate, “Cougar Hill”, Amador County 2011
three 3 III, “Evangelho”, Contra Costa County 2011
Hobo, “Rockpile”, Branham Vineyard, Sonoma County 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Cabernet / Shiraz Blends

August 9th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Cabernet / Shiraz Blends, for inclusion on our list. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. Blending Cabernet Sauvignon with Shiraz certainly isn’t an adaptation of Old World winemaking practices. In fact, staunchly traditional French winemakers scoff at the idea of blending a traditional Bordeaux varietal (Cabernet Sauvignon) with a grape variety from the Rhône (Shiraz). But the Australian way of pairing the elegance and complexity of Cabernet Sauvignon, with the richness and ripeness of Shiraz works tremendously well, resulting in a harmonious combination. The warmer the wine region the more likely it will produce the rich, full flavored style many people associate with Australian red wine. However, Australia also has cool climatic conditions well suited to red varieties which produce lighter and more delicate red wine styles. The world’s classic premium red grape varieties are all found in abundance in Australia. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Penfolds, “Koonunga Hill”, Shiraz/Cabernet, South Australia 2011
Henry’s Drive, “Pillar Box Red”, 68% Shiraz/27% Cabernet Sauvignon & 5% Merlot, Padthaway 2010
Peter Lehmann, “Clancy’s”, 41% Shiraz/ 30% Merlot & 29% Cabernet Sauvignon, Barossa 2010
Penley Estate, “Condor”, Coonawarra 2010
Molly Dooker, “Two Left Feet”, 70% Shiraz/16% Cabernet Sauvignon & 14% Merlot, Australia 2013

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Italian Montepulciano d’Abruzzo

August 14th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Italian Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, for inclusion on our list. Anthony Wagner of G. Housen, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is a type of red wine made from the Montepulciano wine grape in the Abruzzo region of east-central Italy. The grape is however recommended for 20 of Italy's 95 provinces. Up to 10% Sangiovese is permitted to be added to the blend. It is typically a dry wine with soft tannins, and is therefore often consumed young. The Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is classified as DOC and DOCG in Teramo (where it is officially called Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Colline Teramane). If aged by the winery for more than two years, the wine may be labeled "Riserva". This wine should not be confused with Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, a Tuscan wine made from Sangiovese and other grapes, but not the Montepulciano variety. Montepulciano ripens late and has a tendency to favor producing large yields. The grapes can be plump with a low skin to juice ratio. Compared to most Italian varieties, Montepulciano has moderately low acidity and more mild (i.e. softer) than bitter edged tannins. Wine expert Oz Clarke describes Montepulciano as producing a "round, plummy and weighty red with ripe tannins, good acidity and a low price tag" . Jancis Robinson evaluates Montepulciano as a "promising variety" that produces smooth, drinkable wines that can improve for three or four years after vintage. But they tend to have a classic Italian rusticity that blossoms after it breaths for 30 minutes to an hour and is used to wash down just about any Italian food involving pasta, bread, tomatoes, game, beef, charcuterie, cheese, olive oil, garlic… you get the idea. Because of its softer tannins, it’s a red wine that goes well with a wide range of vegetables, beans, and legumes. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Valle Reale, “Vigneto Vigne Nuove” 2012
Casal Bordino, “Reserva” 2007
Samael, “Poggio Anima” 2012
Antonio & Elio Monti 2007
Cantina Zaccagnini, “del Tralecetto” 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000. 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Italian Puglia Reds

August 16th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Italian Puglia Reds, for inclusion on our list. Puglia has always been the engine-room of Italian wine production. This region is hot and flat, but that is mitigated by constant sea breezes - especially from both sides of the southerly Salento peninsula - and long-established bush vines offer some resistance to drought. In truth, much of the regions's massive grape production was from high-yielding vineyards sited on the baking plains, the fruit destined for distillation or to be sold off cheaply in bulk. But many in the Puglian wine industry have realised that contributing cheap wine for distillation or to help fill the European wine lake was a flawed strategy. There is a new emphasis on quality throughout Puglia's regions, and both DOC and IGT appellations are attempting to up their game to compete with bottled wines on a world stage. Negroamaro is king here, making robust reds and fragrant rosés especially in the south, whilst Primitivo is probably the most recognised grape, thanks to its close genetic twin, the Zinfandel of California. Nero di Troia is the third of the big Puglian red wine varieties, with pockets of Aglianico (much more popular in the neighbouring Campania and Basilatica provinces) as well as Montepulciano and Malvasia Nero. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Conti Zecca, “Donna Marzia”, Negroamaro 2011
Castello Monaci, “Pilùna” Primitivo Salento 2011
Vino Biologico, “Terre Nova”, Salice Salentino Rosso 2012
Santa Lucia, “Vigne del Melograno”, Nero d’Troia 2010
Colli dela Murgia, “Mazzaro” 2008

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Red blends

August 20th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Red blends, for inclusion on our list. Stuart Timmons of Farrell Distribution will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Why blend red wines together? There are many rationales. Most obvious is to ameliorate the shortcomings of one wine by adding another with a different set of deficiencies, saving both varieties. The reason that most inexpensive New World wines are without obvious flaw is because they are blends. Most varietally labeled wines are also blends. The laws governing blending vary greatly from country to country. In the U. S. A. a wine may be varietally labeled if 75% of the wine consists of the named variety. So don't imagine that when you purchase a wine labeled Cabernet Sauvignon there isn't a little of something else in there—up to 25%. The past decade has seen a strong trend away from pure varietally labeled wines in the U. S. A. Wine lovers have apparently grown tired of varietal wines that resemble each other too closely and are intrigued by blended wines with proprietary names. Unlike French law, which governs all blends, U. S. law gives the winemaker total discretion. And so we now have blends of Syrah and Zinfandel, unheard of just a decade ago. A dash of history is helpful here because there's a method to the madness: "Field blends" were historically used to protect the farmer and the winemaker. Biodiversity is, after all, a good thing and if for whatever reason the Zinfandel didn't do well one year, or a bug came along with a predilection for Petit Sirah, well, at least part of the year's crop would come through. But there's also a school of thought, maybe a bit romantic, that also believes such field blends allow the vineyard to speak in a more "whole" form, allowing the same terroir to speak in many different languages, creating wines with a broader complexity, more personality, more charm. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Beringer Founders Estate, “Smooth Red Blend”, California 2011
St. Francis Winery, “Red Spash”, California 2009
Artesa, “Elements”, Napa County 80%/Sonoma County 20% 2008
Farrier, “Presshouse”, Alexander Valley 2009
Revenant, “Block 12 Cuvèe”, Paso Robles 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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