Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of South African Reds

July 23rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of South African Reds, for inclusion on our list. Bruce Magoon of Baker Distributing, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The establishment by the Dutch East India Company of a refreshment station at the Cape in 1652 had one single aim: to provide fresh food to the company's merchant fleet on their voyages to India and surrounding areas. Jan van Riebeeck, the first governor of the Cape, planted a vineyard in 1655, and on 2 February 1659, the first wine was made from Cape grapes. Van Riebeeck strongly encouraged farmers to plant vineyards although initially they were most reluctant. There were many setbacks in the beginning, chiefly because of the farmers' ignorance of viticulture. Things improved when Van Riebeeck was succeeded in 1679 by Simon van der Stel, who was not only enthusiastic but very knowledgeable about viticulture and winemaking. He planted a vineyard on his farm Constantia and made good wine from the outset. The Dutch had almost no wine tradition and it was only after the French Huguenots settled at the Cape between 1680 and 1690 that the wine industry began to flourish. Most of the Cape’s winegrowing regions are influenced by one of the two mighty oceans which meet at this southernmost tip of Africa: the Atlantic and the Indian oceans. Combine beneficial maritime influences like regular coastal fog and cooling sea breezes with a moderate Mediterranean climate, distinctive and varied topography, and diverse soils, and you have the ideal conditions in which to create wines of unique character and complexity. South Africa is increasingly moving towards the red blend in order to produce excellent wines. This is a good idea, since they can make distinctive South African wines that are unavailable anywhere else in the world. The focus of these red blends has been on the use of purely red wines (rather than a mix of reds with white as a softener), and they are often called ‘Cape blends‘ in order to distinguish them from any other type of blends from other parts of the world. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Douglas Green, “Rib Shack Red”, 60% Pinotage/40% Syrah, South Africa 2013
Fairview, “Goats do Roam”, 62% Shiraz/14% Mourvedre/11% Grenache/9% Durif 2% Cinsault & 2% Carignan Western Cape 2013
Sincerely, Shiraz, South Africa 2011
Neil Ellis, “The Left Bank”, 48% Cabernet Sauvignon/33% Shiraz/13% Merlot & 6% Cabernet Franc, Western Cape 2011
Bockenhoutskoof, “The Chocolate Block” 70% Syrah/ 13% Cabernet Sauvignon/ 10% Grenache/ 6% Cinsault & 1% Viogner, Western Cape 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Syrah

July 26th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Syrah, for inclusion on our list. Syrah is the primary (sometimes sole) grape variety used to make the famous Rhône wines of Côte Rotie and Hermitage and in fact also forms the backbone structure of most Rhône blends, including Chateauneuf du Pape. Although cultivated since antiquity, competing claims to the origin of this variety have it either being transplanted from Persia, near the similarly-titled city of Shiraz or to being a native vine of France. Starting in 1998, combined research of the University of California at Davis and the French National Agronomy Archives in Montpellier proved syrah is indeed indigenous to France. DNA profiling proved syrah to be a genetic cross of two relatively obscure grapes, the white mondeuse blanc and the black dureza. Syrah is a fairly new variety in California, first introduced in 1971. Some of the state's original vines were propagated from Hermitage in the Rhône Valley and some from Australian cuttings. It is also one of California's most rapidly increasing varieties. In 1984, there were less than 100 acres. By 2007,there were nearly 19,000 vineyard acres planted to Syrah, nearly a third of which is less than four years old. Plantings range over all of the state's temperature zones, from the coolest to the warmest, with San Luis Obispo, San Joaquin, Sonoma, Monterey, Madera and Santa Barbara together accounting for more than half the total acreage. Syrah forms intense wines, with deep violet, nearly black color, chewy texture and richness, and often alcoholic strength, with aromas that tend to be more spicy than fruity. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Cline, Sonoma County 2012
J. Lohr, “South Ridge”, Paso Robles 2012
Clayhouse Vineyard, Paso Robles 2011
Sola, Lodi 2012
Bedrock Wine Co., North Coast 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Cabernet Sauvignon

July 30th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Cabernet Sauvignon, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. In California, Cabernet Sauvignon has developed its characteristic style and reputation, recognizable in the world's market. Production and plantings of the grape in California are similar in quantity to those of Bordeaux. The 1976 Judgement of Paris wine tasting event help to catapult Californian Cabernet Sauvignons onto the international stage when Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars 1973 Stags Leap District Cabernet Sauvignon beat out classified Bordeaux estates like Château Mouton Rothschild, Château Montrose, Château Haut-Brion and Château Léoville-Las Cases in a blind tasting conductes by French wine experts. In California, the main stylistic difference in Cabernet Sauvignon is between hillside/mountain vineyards and those on flatter terrain like valley floors or some areas of the Central Valley. In Napa, the hillside vineyards of Diamond Mountain District, Howell Mountain, Mt. Veeder, Spring Mountain District have thinner, less fertile soils which produces smaller berries with more intense flavors, reminiscent of Bordeaux wines that require years of aging to mature. The yields are also much lower, typically in the range of 1-2 tons per acre in contrast to the 4-8 tons that can be produced in the more fertile valley floors.[2] Wines produced from mountainside vineyards tend to be characterized by deep inky colors and strong berry aromas. Throughout California there are many wine regions that have the potential to grow Cabernet Sauvignon to full ripeness and produce fruity, full-bodied wines with alcohol levels regularly above the Bordeaux average of 12-13% — often in excess of 14%. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Hahn Winery, California 2012
Shooting Star, Lake County 2011
Picket Fence, Alexander Valley 2010
Three Saints, Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara 2010
B Side, Napa Valley 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Sangiovese Blends from Tuscany

August 2nd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Sangiovese Blends from Tuscany, for inclusion on our list. Sanguis Jovis, the Latin origin for the varietal name, literally means "blood of Jove" and it is likely that Sangiovese (a.k.a. Sangioveto or San Gioveto) was known by Etruscan winemakers, although the first literary reference to it was in 1722. It is probably indigenous to Tuscany, whose most famous wine is Chianti. The fruit is slow to mature and late-ripening. With relatively thin skins, it has a tendency to rot in dampness and does not mature well if planted above an elevation of 1,500 feet. Sangiovese vineyards with limestone soil seem to produce wines with more forceful aromas. The hot, dry climate, such as Tuscany provides, is where sangiovese thrives. Because these climatic criteria generally enhance quantity, rather than quality, it takes careful cultivation and winemaking techniques to produce really excellent wine from this grape. Sangiovese is the #1 varietal in Italy with 247,000 acres, 10% of the entire wine grape crop. The flavor profile of Sangiovese is fruity, with moderate to high natural acidity and generally a medium-body ranging from firm and elegant to assertive and robust and a finish that can tend towards bitterness. The aroma is generally not as assertive and easily identifiable as Cabernet Sauvignon, for example, but can have a strawberry, blueberry, faintly floral or hearbal, violet or plummy character. The Sangiovese grape is Tuscanys' most prominent grape, however, many different clonal varieties exist, as many towns have their own local version of Sangiovese. Cabernet Sauvignon has been planted in Tuscany for over 250 years, but has only recently become associated with the region due to the rise of the Super Tuscans. Other international varieties found in Tuscany include Cabernet franc, Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc and Syrah. Of the many local red grape varieties Canaiolo, Colorino, Malvasia nera and Mammolo are the most widely planted. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Bruni, Cabernet Sauvignon/Sangiovese 2012
Sangnineto, “Rosso Toscano” 2008
Ruffino, “IL Ducale”, 60%Sangiovese/20% Merlot & 20% Syrah 2010
Brancain, “Tre”, Rosso Toscano 2010
Rocca di Frassinelo, “Ornello” 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Italian Montepulciano d’Abruzzo

August 14th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Italian Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, for inclusion on our list. Anthony Wagner of G. Housen, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is a type of red wine made from the Montepulciano wine grape in the Abruzzo region of east-central Italy. The grape is however recommended for 20 of Italy's 95 provinces. Up to 10% Sangiovese is permitted to be added to the blend. It is typically a dry wine with soft tannins, and is therefore often consumed young. The Montepulciano d'Abruzzo is classified as DOC and DOCG in Teramo (where it is officially called Montepulciano d'Abruzzo Colline Teramane). If aged by the winery for more than two years, the wine may be labeled "Riserva". This wine should not be confused with Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, a Tuscan wine made from Sangiovese and other grapes, but not the Montepulciano variety. Montepulciano ripens late and has a tendency to favor producing large yields. The grapes can be plump with a low skin to juice ratio. Compared to most Italian varieties, Montepulciano has moderately low acidity and more mild (i.e. softer) than bitter edged tannins. Wine expert Oz Clarke describes Montepulciano as producing a "round, plummy and weighty red with ripe tannins, good acidity and a low price tag" . Jancis Robinson evaluates Montepulciano as a "promising variety" that produces smooth, drinkable wines that can improve for three or four years after vintage. But they tend to have a classic Italian rusticity that blossoms after it breaths for 30 minutes to an hour and is used to wash down just about any Italian food involving pasta, bread, tomatoes, game, beef, charcuterie, cheese, olive oil, garlic… you get the idea. Because of its softer tannins, it’s a red wine that goes well with a wide range of vegetables, beans, and legumes. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Valle Reale, “Vigneto Vigne Nuove” 2012
Casal Bordino, “Reserva” 2007
Samael, “Poggio Anima” 2012
Antonio & Elio Monti 2007
Cantina Zaccagnini, “del Tralecetto” 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000. 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Italian Puglia Reds

August 16th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Italian Puglia Reds, for inclusion on our list. Puglia has always been the engine-room of Italian wine production. This region is hot and flat, but that is mitigated by constant sea breezes - especially from both sides of the southerly Salento peninsula - and long-established bush vines offer some resistance to drought. In truth, much of the regions's massive grape production was from high-yielding vineyards sited on the baking plains, the fruit destined for distillation or to be sold off cheaply in bulk. But many in the Puglian wine industry have realised that contributing cheap wine for distillation or to help fill the European wine lake was a flawed strategy. There is a new emphasis on quality throughout Puglia's regions, and both DOC and IGT appellations are attempting to up their game to compete with bottled wines on a world stage. Negroamaro is king here, making robust reds and fragrant rosés especially in the south, whilst Primitivo is probably the most recognised grape, thanks to its close genetic twin, the Zinfandel of California. Nero di Troia is the third of the big Puglian red wine varieties, with pockets of Aglianico (much more popular in the neighbouring Campania and Basilatica provinces) as well as Montepulciano and Malvasia Nero. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Conti Zecca, “Donna Marzia”, Negroamaro 2011
Castello Monaci, “Pilùna” Primitivo Salento 2011
Vino Biologico, “Terre Nova”, Salice Salentino Rosso 2012
Santa Lucia, “Vigne del Melograno”, Nero d’Troia 2010
Colli dela Murgia, “Mazzaro” 2008

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Red blends

August 20th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Red blends, for inclusion on our list. Stuart Timmons of Farrell Distribution will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Why blend red wines together? There are many rationales. Most obvious is to ameliorate the shortcomings of one wine by adding another with a different set of deficiencies, saving both varieties. The reason that most inexpensive New World wines are without obvious flaw is because they are blends. Most varietally labeled wines are also blends. The laws governing blending vary greatly from country to country. In the U. S. A. a wine may be varietally labeled if 75% of the wine consists of the named variety. So don't imagine that when you purchase a wine labeled Cabernet Sauvignon there isn't a little of something else in there—up to 25%. The past decade has seen a strong trend away from pure varietally labeled wines in the U. S. A. Wine lovers have apparently grown tired of varietal wines that resemble each other too closely and are intrigued by blended wines with proprietary names. Unlike French law, which governs all blends, U. S. law gives the winemaker total discretion. And so we now have blends of Syrah and Zinfandel, unheard of just a decade ago. A dash of history is helpful here because there's a method to the madness: "Field blends" were historically used to protect the farmer and the winemaker. Biodiversity is, after all, a good thing and if for whatever reason the Zinfandel didn't do well one year, or a bug came along with a predilection for Petit Sirah, well, at least part of the year's crop would come through. But there's also a school of thought, maybe a bit romantic, that also believes such field blends allow the vineyard to speak in a more "whole" form, allowing the same terroir to speak in many different languages, creating wines with a broader complexity, more personality, more charm. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Beringer Founders Estate, “Smooth Red Blend”, California 2011
St. Francis Winery, “Red Spash”, California 2009
Artesa, “Elements”, Napa County 80%/Sonoma County 20% 2008
Farrier, “Presshouse”, Alexander Valley 2009
Revenant, “Block 12 Cuvèe”, Paso Robles 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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