Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Argentine Malbec

August 27th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Argentine Malbec, for inclusion on our list. Laura Thompson of Artisanal Cellars, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. One of the traditional "Bordeaux varietals", Malbec has characteristics that fall somewhere between Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. A midseason ripener, it can bring very deep color, ample tannin, and a particular plum-like flavor component to add complexity to claret blends. Malbec truly comes into its own in Argentina, where it is the major red varietal planted. Much of the Malbec vines there were transplanted from Europe prior to the outbreak of phylloxera and most is therefore ungrafted, planted on their own roots. Sadly, over the years, phylloxera has infested Argentina, too, and vineyards are now being replanted on resistant rootstock. Argentines often spell it "Malbeck" and make wines from it that are similar in flavor to those made in Europe, but with softer, lusher structure, more like New World Merlot. Another difference: where French examples are usually considered short-lived, Argentine Malbecs seem to age fairly well. Successful Argentine Malbec growers claim that, in order to develop full maturity and distinction, Malbec needs "hang time" even after sugar levels indicate ripeness. Otherwise, immature Malbec can be very "green" tasting, without its characteristic notes of plum and anise. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Esencias de la Terra, Mendoza 2011
Tiasta, Mendoza 2013
Esencias de la Terra, “Oak”, Mendoza 2007
Hacienda dl Plata, “Zagal”, Mendoza 2011
Hacienda dl Plata, “Mayoral/Grand Reserve”, Mendoza 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Dolcetto’s from the Piedmont

August 30th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Dolcetto’s from the Piedmont, for inclusion on our list. Piedmont, Italy’s westernmost region with borders on Switzerland and France, is hemmed in by the Alps and the Apennines, which explain why its name means "foot of the mountain." Though it ranks only sixth among the regions in total production, Piedmont is considered a giant of Italian wine in every other way. It is admired above all for its red wines, led by the regal Barolo and Barbaresco. An overwhelming majority of Piedmont's wines derives from native vines. Besides the noble Nebbiolo, source of Barolo, Barbaresco, Gattinara and Ghemme, which are all DOCG, Barbera ranks as the most popular vine for reds, followed by Dolcetto, which is enjoyed for its mellow, round flavors. The climate is rigid by Italian standards, with distinct changes of season. Winters are cold with plenty of snow. Summers are for the most part hot and dry. Spring and fall are temperate to cool with fog normal at harvest time. Dolchetto is a medium-bodied, bright red grape variety found in the Piedmont region of northern Italy. In local parlance, the name means "little sweet thing" and refers to the sweetness of the ripe grape. Dolcetto’s aromas and flavors include ripe blackberries and plums. It ripens early and makes soft, dark reds with strong black-fruit flavors and surprisingly soft tannins. Some people compare Dolchetto to Gamay. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Pasquale Pelissero, “Cascine Crosa”, d’Alba 2011
San Fereolo, “Valdiba”, Dogliani 2011
Scagliola, “Da Sempre”, Monferrato 2011
Pecchenino, “San Luigi”, de Dogliani 2009
Edoardo Sobrino, “Vigna Christina”, Diano d’Alba 2005

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Tuscan Chianti

September 3rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Tuscan Chianti, for inclusion on our list. Bruce Magoon of Baker Distributing, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The first definition of a wine-area called Chianti was made in 1716. It described the area near the villages of Gaiole, Castellina and Radda; the so-called Lega del Chianti and later Provincia del Chianti (Chianti province). In 1932 the Chianti area was completely re-drawn and divided in seven sub-areas: Classico, Colli Aretini, Colli Fiorentini, Colline Pisane, Colli Senesi, Montalbano and Rùfina. Most of the villages that in 1932 were suddenly included in the new Chianti Classico area added in Chianti to their name-such as Greve in Chianti which amended its name in 1972. Wines labeled Chianti Classico come from the biggest sub-area of Chianti, that sub-area that includes the old Chianti area. During the 1970s producers started to reduce the quantity of white grapes in Chianti. In 1995 it became legal to produce a Chianti with 100% Sangiovese. For a wine to retain the name of Chianti, it must be produced with at least 80% Sangiovese grapes. Since 1996 the blend for Chianti and Chianti Classico has been 75-100% Sangiovese, up to 10% Canaiolo and up to 20% of any other approved red grape variety such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or Syrah. Since 2006, the use of white grape varieties such as Malvasia and Trebbiano have been prohibited in Chianti Classico. Aged Chianti (38 months instead of 4-7), may be labelled as Riserva. Chianti that meets more stringent requirements (lower yield, higher alcohol content and dry extract) may be labelled as Chianti Superiore, although Chianti from the "Classico" sub-area is not allowed in any event to be labelled as "Superiore". Chianti is a very dry red wine that, like most Italian wines, tastes best with food. It ranges from light-bodied to almost full-bodied, according to the district, producer, vintage, and aging regime. It often has an aroma of cherries and sometimes violets, and has a flavor reminiscent of tart cherries. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Tomaiolo, “Riserva” 2010
Melini, “Riserva” 2010
Ruffino, “Superiore” 2012
Banfi, “Classico Riserva” 2010
Antinori, “Pèppoli Classico” 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Loire Cabernet Francs

September 6th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Loire Cabernet Francs, for inclusion on our list. The Loire is the longest river in France, the last wild river in Europe, and has been designated a World Heritage area by UNESCO. For much of its 630 miles - from the mountains of central France to the coast of Brittany - the Loire is vineyard country. Total wine production makes up the third largest AOC (appellation d'origine contrôlée) viticultural area in France. It is France’s second largest region for sparkling wine and the leading region for white wine production. The Loire River is the cradle of the French Nation. It is where the cultures of north and south meet. Charles Martel stopped the Saracen invasion of Europe at Tours in 731 AD. Joan of Arc met the Dauphin at Chinon in 1429 and convinced him to fight the English. Loire Valley wines include 65 appellations that include every style of wine – red, white, rosé, still, Sparkling, sweet, dry and everything in between. One reason for this diversity is the size of the Loire Valley. The vineyards grow along a 300 mile stretch of the river, so there are several distinct climates and a wide variety of soils that divide the Loire Valley into 5 distinct regions, each with its own characteristic varietals and wine styles. The red wines of the Loire Valley range from fresh and fruity to rich and earthy, but they are never overpowering. The lighter ones can be served chilled at a summer barbecue, and the fuller bodied are excellent for companions for hearty dishes. Cabernet Franc ripens earlier than its more famous cousin (Cabernet Sauvignon), making it better suited to the cooler climate of the Loire. It probably originated in Bordeaux, where it is mainly used for blending, but it is so well suited to conditions in the Loire Valley that it stands alone in such famous wines as Chinon, Bourgueil and Samur-Champigny. Fine old Cabernet Franc wines can, in the words of one Loire Valley winemaker, be reminiscent of the aromas of a forest after a rainstorm. Young Cabernet Franc is an ideal red wine for summer. Older, bigger wines are delicious with roasted meats and are probably the ideal accompaniment to the traditional roast leg of lamb with flageolet beans. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Domaine de la Colline, Chinon 2011
Le Grand Bouqueyeau, “Reserve”, Chinon 2011
Domaine Nau, “Les Bloltières”, Bourgueil 2011
Domaine de la Chevalerie, “Galichets”, Bourgueil 2010
Catherine et Pierre Breton, “La Dilettanté”,Bourgueil 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Columbia Valley Bordeaux Style Reds

September 10th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Columbia Valley Bordeaux Style Reds, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Think about the greatest floods ever documented on Earth—about a wave 500 feet high bursting through the ruptured ice dam of Glacial Lake Missoula, sweeping south across Eastern Washington at 50 miles an hour. Think about the brunt of 2,500 cubic kilometers of water rushing with a flow 10 times greater than the combined flow of all the rivers in the world, scouring the land to its bedrock bones—not just once, but as many as 90 times, as the ice dam repeatedly formed and failed, over intervals of 35 to 55 years, beginning some 15,300 years ago—creating an enormously complex geological riddle and hundreds of publication topics for scores of geologists since J Harlen Bretz first realized how the tortured landscape of the Channeled Scablands was formed. The prevailing southwesterly winds, which still prevail and still continue the geologic process, lifted the glacial sediments, the loess deposited by the floods, carrying it back north, distributing it approximately along the floods’ path, relinquishing finally what remained as the thick loess dunes of the Palouse. This windblown silt deposited over the underlying volcanic basalt, layered with the ash of intermittent eruptions of Northwest volcanoes from Mazama to St. Helens—this is the literal grounding of Eastern Washington’s terroir. Washington’s wine regions mostly lie in the flat, rural, southeastern part of the state (the miniscule Puget Sound appellation, with a mere 80 acres of vineyards, is the lone exception). The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. Other AVAs are much smaller—for instance, Red Mountain, an up- and-coming source for some of the state’s best Cabernet Sauvignons and Merlots, covers just 4,040 acres. At its most basic, vintners blend wine made from different grapes in order to add more complexity to the flavor and texture of a wine. Both reds and whites can be made from blends of varietals. In some cases, they may even blend whites and reds together in order to create the best possible combination of aromas and flavors. Some wine blends are made from classic recipes handed down from generation to generation. Other vintners create brand new blends in an attempt to produce a new and exciting wine that has flavor characteristics like nothing else on the market. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Renegade Wine Co., “Red Wine” 2012
Corvidae Wine Co., “Rook” 2011
Helix by Reininger, “Pomatia” 2010
Sleight of Hand Cellars, “The Spellbinder” 2012
Fall Line Winery, “Exhibition”, Yakima Valley 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Right Bank Bordeaux’s

September 13th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Right Bank Bordeaux’s, for inclusion on our list. A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Average vintages produce over 700 million bottles of Bordeaux wine, ranging from large quantities of everyday table wine, to some of the most expensive and prestigious wines in the world. Red Bordeaux, is generally made from a blend of grapes. Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and Carménère. Today Malbec and Carménère are rarely used, with Château Clerc Milon, a fifth growth Bordeaux, being one of the few to still retain the Carménère vine. Bordeaux wine is made by more than 8,500 producers or Château. There are 60 appellations of Bordeaux wine. In Bordeaux the concept of terroir plays a pivotal role in wine production with the top estates aiming to make terroir driven wines that reflect the place they are from, often from grapes collected from a single vineyard. The Gironde River and its tributaries, the Dordogne and Garonne, divide the Bordeaux region creating two distinct wine production zones - the Left Bank and the Right Bank. These two banks differ mainly in soil composition. On the Right Bank, clay, limestone and sand prevail, all of which are more suited to Merlot. On the Left Bank, gravel predominates, allowing Cabernet Sauvignon to thrive. The Merlot-based wines of the Right Bank are generally more fruit forward and have less tannin than those of the Left Bank. The Right Bank consists of two major regions: Saint-Emilion and Pomerol. Saint-Emilion contains over 900 individual producers. A blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc produces wines that are less tannic, softer, and more forward than those of the Left Bank. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Château Beausejour, “Pentimento”, Montagne-Saint Èmilion 2010
Château Fleur de Jean Gué, Lalande de Pomerol 2011
Clos du Roy, Fronsac 2010
Les Cadrans de Lassègue, Saint-Èmilion 2011
Château Rocher Corbin, Montagne-Saint Èmilion 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Shiraz

September 18th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Shiraz, for inclusion on our list. Robert Boehme of Vermont Wine Merchants Company will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

The Lackey Wines, “The Lackey”, South Australia 2012
Plantagenet, “Hazard Hill”, Western Australia 2010
Hope Estate, “The Ripper”, Western Australia 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Footbolt”, McLaren Vale 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Laughing Magpie”, Shiraz / Viognier, McLaren Vale 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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