Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Reds from the South of France

December 23rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Reds from the South of France, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Languedoc-Roussillon covers the area on the border of the Mediterranean sea between the west of the Rhône and Camargue to the border of Spain and the Pyrénées mountains. Provence (Provençal) wine comes from the French wine-producing region of Provence in southeast France. The Romans called the area nostra provincia ("our province"), giving the region its name. Just south of the Alps, it was the first Roman province outside Italy. The vineyards of this sunny region are one of the largest expanses of vine growing region in the world. The history of Languedoc wines can be traced to the first vineyards planted along the coast near Narbonne by the early Greeks. Along with parts of Provence, these are the oldest planted vineyards in France. Wine has been made in this region for at least 2,600 years, ever since the ancient Greeks founded the city of Marseille in 600 BC. Throughout the region's history, viticulture and winemaking have been influenced by the cultures that have been present in Provence and the Languedoc, which include the Ancient Greeks, Romans, Gauls, Catalans and Savoyards. These diverse groups introduced a large variety of grapes to the region, including grape varieties of Greek and Roman origin as well as Spanish, Italian and traditional French wine grapes. There are some thirty appellations and crus included within the Languedoc-Roussillon region, with roughly 2,800 producers in Languedoc-Roussillon; between them, they make around two billion bottles of wine a year. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Natural Means, “Old School Rouge”, Minervois 2012
Château Massiac, “Sentinel de Massiac”, Minervois 2012
Domaine Faillence, “Noe”, Carignon 2011
Domaine Faillence, Saint Marie, Corbières 2012
Château Valcombe, “Epicure”, Ventoux 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Argentine Red Blends

December 27th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Argentine Red Blends, for inclusion on our list. Argentina is currently the world's fifth largest wine producer by volume – after France, Italy, Spain and the USA in that order – a position it has held for many years. High volume, low quality vines are being replaced by premium varieties. Formerly struggling bodegas are attracting the backing of major international wine companies. Product quality is soaring, and every year the industry balance shifts further from cheap table wines towards exquisitely crafted wines that are increasingly recognised as being amongst the best in the world. The Argentine wine industry is reaping the benefits of its heritage - old vines, unique geographical conditions - with new technology and a mix of modern and traditional methods. It's come along way since the first vines were planted in Mendoza more than 400 years ago. The reason for this was that the indigenous Huarpes of the region had, many years earlier, developed and built a complex and sophisticated system of irrigation channels to bring water from the Mendoza river to the arid plains. The desert climate and advanced irrigation system gives Mendoza's grape growers a unique advantage. With complete control over the watering of their vines, and in combination with the hot daytime temperatures and cool nights during the grape ripening seasons, conditions are almost ideal for growing grapes with ripe, intense fruit characteristics and good acidity levels. Why blend red wines together? There are many rationales. Most obvious is to ameliorate the shortcomings of one wine by adding another with a different set of deficiencies, saving both varieties. The reason that most inexpensive New World wines are without obvious flaw is because they are blends.The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Innovac!on, Mendoza 2013
Bodega Elena de Mendoza, “Red Blend” 2013
Graffigna, “Elevation” Reserve, San Juan 2012
Diseño, “Red Blend”, Mendoza 2013
Luigi Bosca, “De Sangre”, Mendoza 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Vermont Reds

December 30th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Vermont Reds, for inclusion on our list. Stuart Timmons of Farrell Distribution will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vermont is home to a small but growing wine industry. Up and coming grape varieties such as Marquette, Frontenac, and La Crescent thrive in Vermont, and make delicious and award-winning wines. Our region is also rich with beekeepers and apple & fruit growers, and our meads, ciders, and fruit wines reflect the flavors of our state. Grape growers in places like New England and the Upper Midwest used to be limited to a few varieties like Concord. Even these grapes didn’t always ripen in our relatively short growing season, and even when they did ripen, they were suitable mostly for jelly and juice. Their “foxy” flavor was nothing that wine drinkers wanted in their glass. But all that is changing. The University of Minnesota has an active grape breeding program, and they have created new varieties that not only survive the northern winter, but can be made into wine that is excellent by any standard. Another group of winter-hardy grape varieties was created by the late Elmer Swenson, a private breeder from Osceola, Wisconsin. Vineyards that will survive to minus 25, minus 35, some even to minus 40 degrees F. are now being planted in places like Minnesota and Quebec. Excellent wine is being produced and sold at these vineyards, and more vineyards are being planted as fast as the vines can be propagated. Hardy table grapes are also being planted. The world of grape growing has truly moved North! Wine lovers the world over know the pleasure of local food and wine, hand-crafted by real people you can talk to, and reflecting the terroir of the place it is from. Our Vermont wine makers and grape growers are emerging from the heart of this tradition. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Charlotte Village Winery, Merlot N.V.
Charlotte Village Winery Cabernet Sauvignon N.V.
Green Mountain Vineyards, Frontenac 2012
East Shore, Cabernet Franc 2012
Snow Farm, Leon Millot 2013

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Piedmont Nebbiolo

January 3rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Piedmont Nebbiolo, for inclusion on our list. Ampelographers believe that Nebbiolo is indigenous to the Piedmont region though some DNA evidence suggest that it may have originated in Lombardy. In the 1st century AD, Pliny the Elder noted the exceptional quality of the wine produced in Pollenzo region located northwest of what is now the Barolo DOCG zone. While Pliny does not explicitly name the grape responsible for these Pollenzo wines, his description of the wine bears similarities to later descriptions of Nebbiolo-based wines, making this potentially the first notation of wine made from Nebbiolo in the Piedmont region. The first explicit mention of Nebbiolo dates to 1268 where a wine known as "nibiol" was growing in Rivoli near Turin. Like the finicky Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo is extremely site-sensitive, difficult to grow and tempermental in the cellar. Some winemakers say it is the most difficult wine grape to work with. It prefers cooler areas with warm-to-hot daytime temperatures and a high degree of luminosity. Also like Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo is usually not blended with other varieties, but boasts multiple clones that are often inter-planted, thereby imparting complexity to the wine's aroma, flavor and structure. Wines made from nebbiolo are typically dark, tart, tannic and alcoholic. The best smell of cherries, violets and black licorice or truffles and have rich, chewy, deep and long-lasting flavors of tar and roses. Good Nebbiolo can harmonize with the richest, strongest-flavored meats and stews, as well as dry, aged cheeses that may be too strong or distinctive for other wines. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Guildobono, Langhe 2013
Pertinace, Langhe 2011
Rivetto, Langhe 2011
Ascheri, Nebbiolo d’Alba 2012
Deforville, Langhe 2013

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Syrah from California

January 7th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Syrah from California, for inclusion on our list. Bruce Magoon of Baker Distributing, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Syrah is the primary (sometimes sole) grape variety used to make the famous Rhône wines of Côte Rotie and Hermitage and in fact also forms the backbone structure of most Rhône blends, including Chateauneuf du Pape. Although cultivated since antiquity, competing claims to the origin of this variety have it either being transplanted from Persia, near the similarly-titled city of Shiraz or to being a native vine of France. Starting in 1998, combined research of the University of California at Davis and the French National Agronomy Archives in Montpellier proved syrah is indeed indigenous to France. DNA profiling proved syrah to be a genetic cross of two relatively obscure grapes, the white mondeuse blanc and the black dureza. Syrah is a fairly new variety in California, first introduced in 1971. Some of the state's original vines were propagated from Hermitage in the Rhône Valley and some from Australian cuttings. It is also one of California's most rapidly increasing varieties. In 1984, there were less than 100 acres. By 2007,there were nearly 19,000 vineyard acres planted to Syrah, nearly a third of which is less than four years old. Plantings range over all of the state's temperature zones, from the coolest to the warmest, with San Luis Obispo, San Joaquin, Sonoma, Monterey, Madera and Santa Barbara together accounting for more than half the total acreage. Syrah forms intense wines, with deep violet, nearly black color, chewy texture and richness, and often alcoholic strength, with aromas that tend to be more spicy than fruity. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Blackstone, “Winemaker’s Select”, California 2011
Sterling, “Vintner’s Collection”, Central Coast, 2012
Clos du Bois, “Hand Selected Lots”, North Coast 2012
J. Lohr, “South Ridge”, Paso Robles 2012
Truchard, Carneros / Napa Valley 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Washington State Merlot

January 10th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Washington State Merlot, for inclusion on our list. Think about the greatest floods ever documented on Earth—about a wave 500 feet high bursting through the ruptured ice dam of Glacial Lake Missoula, sweeping south across Eastern Washington at 50 miles an hour. Think about the brunt of 2,500 cubic kilometers of water rushing with a flow 10 times greater than the combined flow of all the rivers in the world, scouring the land to its bedrock bones—not just once, but as many as 90 times, as the ice dam repeatedly formed and failed, over intervals of 35 to 55 years, beginning some 15,300 years ago—creating an enormously complex geological riddle and hundreds of publication topics for scores of geologists since J Harlen Bretz first realized how the tortured landscape of the Channeled Scablands was formed. The prevailing southwesterly winds, which still prevail and still continue the geologic process, lifted the glacial sediments, the loess deposited by the floods, carrying it back north, distributing it approximately along the floods’ path, relinquishing finally what remained as the thick loess dunes of the Palouse. This windblown silt deposited over the underlying volcanic basalt, layered with the ash of intermittent eruptions of Northwest volcanoes from Mazama to St. Helens—this is the literal grounding of Eastern Washington’s terroir. Washington’s wine regions mostly lie in the flat, rural, southeastern part of the state (the miniscule Puget Sound appellation, with a mere 80 acres of vineyards, is the lone exception). The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. Other AVAs are much smaller—for instance, Red Mountain, an up- and-coming source for some of the state’s best Cabernet Sauvignons and Merlots, covers just 4,040 acres. Washington Merlot, with its cherry flavors and aroma, tends to be more full-bodied, moderately tannic and slightly higher in alcohol than its Bordeaux cousins, and higher in acidity than those from California. Washington Merlot is known for its sweet cherry and berry flavors and complex aromas that include mint, cigar box, and sweet spices like nutmeg and cardamom.The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Powers, Columbia Valley 2012
Milbrandt Vineyards, “Traditions”, Columbia Valley 2012
Chateau Ste. Michelle, “Indian Wells”, Columbia Valley 2012
Kiona Vineyards, Columbia Valley 2010
Chateau Ste. Michelle, “Canoe Ridge Estate”, Horse Heaven Hills 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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