Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Shiraz

September 18th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Shiraz, for inclusion on our list. Robert Boehme of Vermont Wine Merchants Company will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

The Lackey Wines, “The Lackey”, South Australia 2012
Plantagenet, “Hazard Hill”, Western Australia 2010
Hope Estate, “The Ripper”, Western Australia 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Footbolt”, McLaren Vale 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Laughing Magpie”, Shiraz / Viognier, McLaren Vale 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of French Languedoc Reds

September 25th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of French Languedoc Reds, for inclusion on our list. Anthony Wagner of G. Housen, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The region of Languedoc has belonged to France since the thirteenth century and the Roussillon was acquired from Spain in the mid-seventeenth century. The two regions were joined as one administrative region in the late 1980s. The Languedoc-Roussillon is the world’s largest wine-producing region. Languedoc’s wine production exceeds that of Bordeaux, of Australia, and that of South Africa and Chile combined Languedoc-Roussillon’s wine represents a third of the volume of all French output (in 2006, the region produced 15,750,000 hectolitres of wine, which accounted for 34 per cent of total French output). Today, Languedoc-Roussillon’s wine production is all about quality rather than quantity: in just under 20 years, Languedoc has actively reduced its production from an annual average of 29 million hectolitres to 16 million. There are some thirty appellations and crus included within the Languedoc-Roussillon region, with roughly 2,800 producers in Languedoc-Roussillon; between them, they make around two billion bottles of wine a year. Wine has been made in this region for at least 2,600 years, ever since the ancient Greeks founded the city of Marseille in 600 BC. Throughout the region's history, viticulture and winemaking have been influenced by the cultures that have been present in Provence, which include the Ancient Greeks, Romans, Gauls, Catalans and Savoyards. These diverse groups introduced a large variety of grapes to the region, including grape varieties of Greek and Roman origin as well as Spanish, Italian and traditional French wine grapes. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Le Petit Saint-Jacques, Pays d’Oc, 50% Cabernet/50% Grenache 2010
Château de Lascaux, 60% Syrah, 30% Grenache & 10% Mourvedre 2012
Château de Lascaux, “Carra”, Pic Saint-Loup 2011
Laguzell, Minervous 2013
Domaine Leon Barral, Faugères 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Puglia Negroamaro Reds

September 27th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Puglia Negroamaro Reds, for inclusion on our list. Puglia has always been the engine-room of Italian wine production. This region is hot and flat, but that is mitigated by constant sea breezes - especially from both sides of the southerly Salento peninsula - and long-established bush vines offer some resistance to drought. In truth, much of the regions's massive grape production was from high-yielding vineyards sited on the baking plains, the fruit destined for distillation or to be sold off cheaply in bulk. But many in the Puglian wine industry have realised that contributing cheap wine for distillation or to help fill the European wine lake was a flawed strategy. There is a new emphasis on quality throughout Puglia's regions, and both DOC and IGT appellations are attempting to up their game to compete with bottled wines on a world stage. Negroamaro is king here, making robust reds and fragrant rosés especially in the south, whilst Primitivo is probably the most recognised grape, thanks to its close genetic twin, the Zinfandel of California. Nero di Troia is the third of the big Puglian red wine varieties, with pockets of Aglianico (much more popular in the neighbouring Campania and Basilatica provinces) as well as Montepulciano and Malvasia Nero. Negroamaro, is a red wine grape variety native to southern Italy. It is grown almost exclusively in Puglia and particularly in Salento, the peninsula which can be visualised as the “heel” of Italy. The grape can produce wines very deep in color. Wines made from Negroamaro tend to be very rustic in character, combining perfume with an earthy bitterness. The grape produces some of the best red wines of Puglia, particularly when blended with the highly scented Malvasia Nera, as in the case of Salice Salentino. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Sule, Salento, Negroamaro 2011
Cantele, Salice Salentino, “Rosso Reserva”, 100% Negroamaro 2012
Vino Biologico, “Terre Nova”, Salice Salentino Rosso 2012
Apollonia, “Rosso”, Salice Salentino, 80% Negroamaro / 20% Malvasia Nera 2008
Apollonia, “Copertino”, 70% Negroamaro, 20% Montepuliciano & 10% Malvasia Nera 2007

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Red Blends

October 4th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Red Blends, for inclusion on our list. Why blend red wines together? There are many rationales. Most obvious is to ameliorate the shortcomings of one wine by adding another with a different set of deficiencies, saving both varieties. The reason that most inexpensive New World wines are without obvious flaw is because they are blends. Most varietally labeled wines are also blends. The laws governing blending vary greatly from country to country. In the U. S. A. a wine may be varietally labeled if 75% of the wine consists of the named variety. So don't imagine that when you purchase a wine labeled Cabernet Sauvignon there isn't a little of something else in there—up to 25%. The past decade has seen a strong trend away from pure varietally labeled wines in the U. S. A. Wine lovers have apparently grown tired of varietal wines that resemble each other too closely and are intrigued by blended wines with proprietary names. Unlike French law, which governs all blends, U. S. law gives the winemaker total discretion. And so we now have blends of Syrah and Zinfandel, unheard of just a decade ago. A dash of history is helpful here because there's a method to the madness: "Field blends" were historically used to protect the farmer and the winemaker. Biodiversity is, after all, a good thing and if for whatever reason the Zinfandel didn't do well one year, or a bug came along with a predilection for Petit Sirah, well, at least part of the year's crop would come through. But there's also a school of thought, maybe a bit romantic, that also believes such field blends allow the vineyard to speak in a more "whole" form, allowing the same terroir to speak in many different languages, creating wines with a broader complexity, more personality, more charm. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Ca’Momi, “Rosso di Napa”, Napa Valley 2013
Folk Machine, “Parts & Labor”, California 2013
Cochon, “Papa Rocks”, California 2011
Duckhorn, “Decoy”, Sonoma County 2012
Whitehall Lane, “Tre Leoni”, Napa Valley 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000. 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Austrian Grüner Veltliner

October 8th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Austrian Grüner Veltliner, for inclusion on our list. Laura Thompson of Artisanal Cellars, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The vineyards in Austria cover 51,000 hectares which, for the most part, lie in the east and southeast of the country. Amongst the wines produced here, white wines unquestionably make up the larger portion – cultivated in 70% of the vineyards. Nevertheless, red wine has come to represent 30% of the vineyards in recent years. Austria has approximately 20,000 small wine producing estates, many of whose financial existence is based on the selling of wine directly on the premises. However, more than half of the wine-growing country features estates with over 5 hectares of vineyards, with most of these highly competitive export-wise. Wine estates regarded as large, according to an international standard (consisting of more than 200 hectares), are rare in Austria. Grüner Veltliner’s Peppery spice, fruitiness with a usually dry finish. With a share of about a third of Austria’s total viticultural area, the Grüner Veltliner is the most important variety grown in Austria. The quality spectrum of the Grüner Veltliner is sweeping, extending from light, effervescent wines that are best drunk young – as “Heuriger” – to Spätlese wines that are rich in extracts and alcohol and thus age particularly well. In Austria, however, it is still very much the tradition to drink the wine as young as possible, which is somewhat regrettable; and to drink them with food, which is absolutely correct. Grüner Veltliner is perhaps the single most versatile food wine in the world, often surpassing even Riesling because of its ability to pair with "difficult" foods such as artichokes and asparagus. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Paul D., Wagram 2013
Anton Bauer, “Rosenberg”, Wagram 2013
Steininger, Kamptal 2013
Steininger, “Kittmannsberg”, Kamptal Reserve 2012
Tegernseerhof, “Bergdistel”, Wachau Smaragd 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Malbec

October 11th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Malbec, for inclusion on our list. Prior to Prohibition in the United States, Malbec was a significant variety in California used mainly for blended bulk wine production. After Prohibition, the grape was a minor variety until it experienced a surge of interest as a component of "Meritage" Bordeaux-style blends in the mid-1990s. Between 1995 and 2003, plantings of Malbec in California increased from 1000 acres (250 hectares) to more than 7000 acres (2,830 hectares). While the appearance of Californian varietal Malbec is increasing, the grape is still most widely used for blending.[3] In California, the American Viticultural Areas (AVA) with the most plantings of Malbec include Napa Valley, Alexander Valley, Paso Robles and Sonoma Valley. One of the traditional "Bordeaux varietals", Malbec has characteristics that fall somewhere between Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. A midseason ripener, it can bring very deep color, ample tannin, and a particular plum-like flavor component to add complexity to claret blends. Successful Argentine Malbec growers claim that, in order to develop full maturity and distinction, Malbec needs "hang time" even after sugar levels indicate ripeness. Otherwise, immature Malbec can be very "green" tasting, without its characteristic notes of plum and anise. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

McManis Family Vineyards, California 2012
L de Lyeth, California 2011
Clayhouse Vineyard, Paso Robles 2011
Francis Coppola, “Diamond Collection”, California 2012
Make Work, Alexander Valley, 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Social Share

Collect a few of your favorite things as you browse. Learn More

My Scrapbook