Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Gamay’s not from Beaujolais

November 1st 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Gamay’s not from Beaujolais, for inclusion on our list. The Gamay grape is thought to have appeared first in the village of the Gamay, south of Beaune, in the 1360s. The grape brought relief to the village growers following the decline of the Black Death. In contrast to the Pinot Noir variety, Gamay ripened two weeks earlier and was less difficult to cultivate. It also produced a strong, fruitier wine in a much larger abundance. In July 1395, the Duke of Burgundy Philippe the Bold outlawed the cultivation of the grape, referring to it as the "disloyal Gaamez" that in spite of its ability to grow in abundance was full of "very great and horrible harshness", due in part to the variety's occupation of land that could be used for the more "elegant" Pinot Noir. 60 years later, Philippe the Good, issued another edict against Gamay in which he stated the reasoning for the ban is that "The Dukes of Burgundy are known as the lords of the best wines in Christendom. We will maintain our reputation". Gamay is a very vigorous vine which tends not to root very deep on alkaline soils resulting in pronounced hydrological stress on the vines over the growing season with a correspondingly high level of acidity in the grapes. The acidity is softened through carbonic maceration, a process that also gives the wine tropical flavors and aromas, reminiscent of bananas. Gamay-based wines are typically light bodied and fruity. Wines meant to be drunk after some modest aging tend to have more body and are produced by whole-berry maceration. Gamay is a purple-colored grape variety used to make red wines, most notably grown in Beaujolais and in the Loire Valley around Tours. Its full name is Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc. It is a very old cultivar, mentioned as long ago as the 15th century. It has been often cultivated because it makes for abundant production; however, it can produce wines of distinction when planted on acidic soils, which help to soften the grape's naturally high acidity. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Pascel Pibaleau, Gamay Val de Loire 2012
Les Saldonettes, “Les Copines Aussi” Loire 2011
Domaine Guillot-Broux, Mâcon-Cruzille 2013
Oliver Cousin, “Yamag”, Loire 2012
Menette, “Zev Rovine”, Auvergne NV

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Shiraz

November 6th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Shiraz, for inclusion on our list. Anthony Wagner of G. Housen, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Madcap Wines, “Pastor Fritz”, Barossa Valley 2005
Misfit Wine Co., “Cycle Buff Beauty”, South Australia 2012
Zonte’s Footstep, “Lake Doctor Vineyard”, Langhorne Creek 2010
Shinas Estate, “The Guilty”, South Eastern Australia 2012
Old Plains, “Power of One”, Adelaide Plains 2005

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Californian Meritage Blends

November 8th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Californian Meritage Blends, for inclusion on our list. Most wines are varietal wines, named after the grape variety that comprises at least 75% of that wine. For example, a “Cabernet Sauvignon” labeled as such must be made from 75%-100% Cabernet Sauvignon grapes. Many winemakers, however, believe the 75% varietal requirement does not necessarily result in the highest quality wine. And the generic name for wines with less than 75% of a grape varietal — “table wine” — does not convey quality. Meritage, pronounced like heritage, first appeared in the late 1980s after a group of American vintners joined forces to create a name for New World wines blended in the tradition of Bordeaux. The word was selected from more than 6,000 entries in an international contest. Meritage combines “merit,” reflecting the quality of the grapes, with “heritage,” which recognizes the centuries-old tradition of blending, long considered to be the highest form of the winemaker’s art. Meritage wines are growing in popularity and are currently the second fastest growing wine category in the industry. They are highly regarded for their aging potential, yet are completely approachable in their youth. Many Meritage wines have proprietary names in addition to, or rather than, Meritage. In order to obtain a license and use the term Meritage on a label, a wine must meet certain criteria. A Red Meritage is a blend of two or more of the red “noble” Bordeaux varieties — Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Merlot, Petit Verdot and the rarer St. Macaire, Gros Verdot and Carmenère. If the blend includes any other grape variety, it is, by definition, not a Meritage. Also, to qualify as a Meritage, no single grape variety can make up more than 90% of the blend.  The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Fleur de Lyeth, “Red Wine” California 2011
Sterling, “Vintner’s Collection”, Meritage, Central Coast 2012
Murrieta’s Well, “The Spur”, Livermore Valley 2011
B Side, “Red Wine Blend”, Napa 2010
Trione, “Geyserville Ranch”, Alexander Valley 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Spanish Reds

November 12th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Spanish Reds, for inclusion on our list. Laura Thompson of Artisanal Cellars, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. With nearly 1.16 million hectares under vine (of which 97.4% is for wine) Spain continues to be the country with the largest area of vine cultivation in the European Union and the world (it accounts for 30% of the total EU area, followed by France and Italy with approximately 22% each). Spain’s geographical position, its climatic differences and its wide variety of soil types makes it a privileged place for producing wines with very different characteristics. Vines are grown in all 17 of the country’s autonomous regions, even though nearly half of the total acreage is found in Castilla-La Mancha (540,000 ha) which is the geographical region with the largest area under vine cultivation in the world. It is unclear precisely where vines were first cultivated in Spain or who brought winemaking techniques to the Iberian peninsula. Various sources believe the first vineyards were cultivated on the southwest coast of Andalusia, which may also have been the entrance point for the first vines reaching the peninsula. Given the presence of the Phoenicians there approximately 3,000 years ago. They were a trading culture and founded a port in the southwest, which they called Gadir (now Cádiz). Later they moved inland, founding another city they called Xera (now Jerez), where they planted vines in the surrounding hills. Spanish winemaking really took off after the Reconquest of Spain by the Catholic Kings. The re-established religious communities and monasteries played a significant role in this process; the monks and friars of various orders worked to recover the winemaking tradition. Among the Tintos, the best-known and most widely-used variety is Tempranillo. Other grapes used include Garnacha Tinta, Graciano, and Mazuelo. A typical blend will consist of approximately 60% Tempranillo and up to 20% Garnacha, with much smaller proportions of Mazuelo and Graciano. Each grape adds a unique component to the wine with Tempranillo contributing the main flavors and aging potential to the wine; Garnacha adding body and alcohol; Mazuelo adding seasoning flavors and Graciano adding additional aromas. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Castillo de Anna, “Tempranillo”, Valencia (3 Liter) 2012
Quo, “Old Vines Grenache”, Campo de Borja 2011
Lealtanza, “Crianza”, Rioja 2011
Ennak, “Crianza”, Terre Alta 2010
Vi De La Terra Mallorca, “Plumia”, Mallorca 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of French Cahors

November 15th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of French Cahors, for inclusion on our list. Cahors has had a rich history since Celtic times. The original name of the town was Divona or Divona Cadurcorum, "Divona of the Cadurci," a Celtic people of Gaul before the Roman conquest in the 50s BC. Cahors was prominent in the Middle Ages and saw considerable conflict during the Hundred Years War and the later Wars of Religion. It was also infamous at that time for having bankers that charged interest on their loans. The church in these times said that using money as an end in itself (usury) was a sin. Because of this Cahors became synonymous with this sin, and was mentioned in Dante's Inferno alongside Sodom as wicked. The area around Cahors produces wine, primarily robust and tannic red wine. Wine from the Cahors appellation must be made from at least 70% Cot (also called Malbec, Mabeck, Auxerrois and Pressac) grape, with a maximum of 30% Merlot or Tannat grape varieties. Cahors is a red wine from grapes grown in or around the town of Cahors, France. Cahors is an Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) which forms part of the South West France wine region. As a reflection of the character of the Malbec variety, Cahors wine can be rather tannic when young, and benefit from aging. Generally, the style of Cahors wine is often similar to robust versions of Bordeaux wine. There are 4,200 hectares (10,000 acres) of Cahors vineyards. The designation AOC Cahors may only be used for red wines. There is also some white and rosé wine produced in the same area, and it is sold under the designation Vin de Pays du Lot instead. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Château Gautoul 2009
Clos Siguier 2011
Château Les Hauts d’Aglan 2009
Château Haut-Monplaisir 2011
Château de Chambert 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Reds from Portugal

November 26th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Reds from Portugal, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Occupying a long narrow strip down the western seaboard of the Iberian Peninsula, the dominant factor on grape growing in Portugal is the Atlantic ocean. In all but the deep south of the country coastal conditions are wet and cool. Grapes grown here are fairly difficult to ripen and light, high-acid wines like Vinho Verde are made. Further inland in the north, the climate is considerably warmer and sunnier, rainfall is lighter and the vineyards are more sheltered. This Northeastern quarter of the country is home to most of the great wine regions which grow the grapes not only for Port, but for an increasingly good range of red wines. Rather like the Northern Rhône, the upper reach of the Douro Valley is a steeply sloping, cavernous landscape, where terraces have to be blasted into granite and schistous rock for the vines to gain a foothold. There is a very large range of indigenous Portuguese grape varieties, which is one of the potential strengths of the wine-making scene: not too much incursion as yet by the ubiquitous "international" varieties. How can you get your head around the wines of a country that has more than 250 native grapes? Not all of them are world-beaters, but a significant number make great wines, taste like no other grapes on earth and work well in Portuguese soils. In addition, in this deeply conservative, traditional country, a new generation of winemakers is really shaking things up. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Esporão, “Alandra”, Portugal 2013 (3 Liter Box)
Quinta de Bons-Veatos, Lisboa 2012
Esporão, “Assobio”, Douro 2011
Dona Ermelinda, Palmela 2010
Crasto, Douro 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Washington State red blends

November 29th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Washington State red blends, for inclusion on our list. Think about the greatest floods ever documented on Earth—about a wave 500 feet high bursting through the ruptured ice dam of Glacial Lake Missoula, sweeping south across Eastern Washington at 50 miles an hour. Think about the brunt of 2,500 cubic kilometers of water rushing with a flow 10 times greater than the combined flow of all the rivers in the world, scouring the land to its bedrock bones—not just once, but as many as 90 times, as the ice dam repeatedly formed and failed, over intervals of 35 to 55 years, beginning some 15,300 years ago—creating an enormously complex geological riddle and hundreds of publication topics for scores of geologists since J Harlen Bretz first realized how the tortured landscape of the Channeled Scablands was formed. The prevailing southwesterly winds, which still prevail and still continue the geologic process, lifted the glacial sediments, the loess deposited by the floods, carrying it back north, distributing it approximately along the floods’ path, relinquishing finally what remained as the thick loess dunes of the Palouse. This windblown silt deposited over the underlying volcanic basalt, layered with the ash of intermittent eruptions of Northwest volcanoes from Mazama to St. Helens—this is the literal grounding of Eastern Washington’s terroir. Washington’s wine regions mostly lie in the flat, rural, southeastern part of the state (the miniscule Puget Sound appellation, with a mere 80 acres of vineyards, is the lone exception). The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. Other AVAs are much smaller—for instance, Red Mountain, an up- and-coming source for some of the state’s best Cabernet Sauvignons and Merlots, covers just 4,040 acres. At its most basic, vintners blend wine made from different grapes in order to add more complexity to the flavor and texture of a wine. Both reds and whites can be made from blends of varietals. In some cases, they may even blend whites and reds together in order to create the best possible combination of aromas and flavors. Some wine blends are made from classic recipes handed down from generation to generation. Other vintners create brand new blends in an attempt to produce a new and exciting wine that has flavor characteristics like nothing else on the market. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Columbia-Crest, “H3”, Les Chevaux Horse Heaven Hills 2011
N X NW, “Red Blend”, Columbia Valley 2011
Bergevin Lane, “Calico Red, Columbia Valley 2010
Chateau Ste. Michelle, “Indian Wells”, Columbia Valley 2010
Hedges, “Red Mountain”, Columbia Valley 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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