Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Loire Whites

October 2nd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Loire Whites, for inclusion on our list. Stuart Timmons of Farrell Distribution will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The Loire is the longest river in France, the last wild river in Europe, and has been designated a World Heritage area by UNESCO. For much of its 630 miles - from the mountains of central France to the coast of Brittany - the Loire is vineyard country. Total wine production makes up the third largest AOC (appellation d'origine contrôlée) viticultural area in France. It is France’s second largest region for sparkling wine and the leading region for white wine production. The Loire River is the cradle of the French Nation. It is where the cultures of north and south meet. Charles Martel stopped the Saracen invasion of Europe at Tours in 731 AD. Joan of Arc met the Dauphin at Chinon in 1429 and convinced him to fight the English. The vineyards grow along a 300 mile stretch of the river, so there are several distinct climates and a wide variety of soils that divide the Loire Valley into 5 distinct regions, each with its own characteristic varietals and wine styles. In the 16th century, kings and nobles built their great Chateaux in the Loire Valley, preferring it to all other parts of France. Loire Valley wines include 65 appellations that include every style of wine – red, white, rosé, still, Sparkling, sweet, dry and everything in between. One reason for this diversity is the size of the Loire Valley. The white wines can be crisp and dry, or rich and aromatic. Their fruity aromas and refreshing acidity make them ideal food wines and the absence of oak makes them especially refreshing. As you can tell, there is no single predominant grape variety in the Loire Valley. This is in part tradition and in part because within such a large area, there are numerous soil types and micro-climates where certain grapes are more successful than others. However, within the variety, all Loire Valley grapes have certain qualities in common. All of them can ripen fully in the relatively short growing season of the Loire Valley. The mild climate also insures relatively high acidity, which gives the wines, no matter how ripe, a refreshing leanness. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Domaine Jean Aubron, “Grand Fief de L’Audigere”, Sur Lie, Muscadet Sèrve et Maine 2011
Château Moncontour, “Demi-Sec”, Vouvray 2011
Le Rocher des Violettes, “Touche Mitaine”, Montlouis-Sur-Loire 2011
Quintessence, Pouilly Fume 2012
Henry Natter, Sancerre 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Red Blends

October 4th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Red Blends, for inclusion on our list. Why blend red wines together? There are many rationales. Most obvious is to ameliorate the shortcomings of one wine by adding another with a different set of deficiencies, saving both varieties. The reason that most inexpensive New World wines are without obvious flaw is because they are blends. Most varietally labeled wines are also blends. The laws governing blending vary greatly from country to country. In the U. S. A. a wine may be varietally labeled if 75% of the wine consists of the named variety. So don't imagine that when you purchase a wine labeled Cabernet Sauvignon there isn't a little of something else in there—up to 25%. The past decade has seen a strong trend away from pure varietally labeled wines in the U. S. A. Wine lovers have apparently grown tired of varietal wines that resemble each other too closely and are intrigued by blended wines with proprietary names. Unlike French law, which governs all blends, U. S. law gives the winemaker total discretion. And so we now have blends of Syrah and Zinfandel, unheard of just a decade ago. A dash of history is helpful here because there's a method to the madness: "Field blends" were historically used to protect the farmer and the winemaker. Biodiversity is, after all, a good thing and if for whatever reason the Zinfandel didn't do well one year, or a bug came along with a predilection for Petit Sirah, well, at least part of the year's crop would come through. But there's also a school of thought, maybe a bit romantic, that also believes such field blends allow the vineyard to speak in a more "whole" form, allowing the same terroir to speak in many different languages, creating wines with a broader complexity, more personality, more charm. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Ca’Momi, “Rosso di Napa”, Napa Valley 2013
Folk Machine, “Parts & Labor”, California 2013
Cochon, “Papa Rocks”, California 2011
Duckhorn, “Decoy”, Sonoma County 2012
Whitehall Lane, “Tre Leoni”, Napa Valley 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000. 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Austrian Grüner Veltliner

October 8th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Austrian Grüner Veltliner, for inclusion on our list. Laura Thompson of Artisanal Cellars, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The vineyards in Austria cover 51,000 hectares which, for the most part, lie in the east and southeast of the country. Amongst the wines produced here, white wines unquestionably make up the larger portion – cultivated in 70% of the vineyards. Nevertheless, red wine has come to represent 30% of the vineyards in recent years. Austria has approximately 20,000 small wine producing estates, many of whose financial existence is based on the selling of wine directly on the premises. However, more than half of the wine-growing country features estates with over 5 hectares of vineyards, with most of these highly competitive export-wise. Wine estates regarded as large, according to an international standard (consisting of more than 200 hectares), are rare in Austria. Grüner Veltliner’s Peppery spice, fruitiness with a usually dry finish. With a share of about a third of Austria’s total viticultural area, the Grüner Veltliner is the most important variety grown in Austria. The quality spectrum of the Grüner Veltliner is sweeping, extending from light, effervescent wines that are best drunk young – as “Heuriger” – to Spätlese wines that are rich in extracts and alcohol and thus age particularly well. In Austria, however, it is still very much the tradition to drink the wine as young as possible, which is somewhat regrettable; and to drink them with food, which is absolutely correct. Grüner Veltliner is perhaps the single most versatile food wine in the world, often surpassing even Riesling because of its ability to pair with "difficult" foods such as artichokes and asparagus. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Paul D., Wagram 2013
Anton Bauer, “Rosenberg”, Wagram 2013
Steininger, Kamptal 2013
Steininger, “Kittmannsberg”, Kamptal Reserve 2012
Tegernseerhof, “Bergdistel”, Wachau Smaragd 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Malbec

October 11th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Malbec, for inclusion on our list. Prior to Prohibition in the United States, Malbec was a significant variety in California used mainly for blended bulk wine production. After Prohibition, the grape was a minor variety until it experienced a surge of interest as a component of "Meritage" Bordeaux-style blends in the mid-1990s. Between 1995 and 2003, plantings of Malbec in California increased from 1000 acres (250 hectares) to more than 7000 acres (2,830 hectares). While the appearance of Californian varietal Malbec is increasing, the grape is still most widely used for blending.[3] In California, the American Viticultural Areas (AVA) with the most plantings of Malbec include Napa Valley, Alexander Valley, Paso Robles and Sonoma Valley. One of the traditional "Bordeaux varietals", Malbec has characteristics that fall somewhere between Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. A midseason ripener, it can bring very deep color, ample tannin, and a particular plum-like flavor component to add complexity to claret blends. Successful Argentine Malbec growers claim that, in order to develop full maturity and distinction, Malbec needs "hang time" even after sugar levels indicate ripeness. Otherwise, immature Malbec can be very "green" tasting, without its characteristic notes of plum and anise. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

McManis Family Vineyards, California 2012
L de Lyeth, California 2011
Clayhouse Vineyard, Paso Robles 2011
Francis Coppola, “Diamond Collection”, California 2012
Make Work, Alexander Valley, 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Italian Reds from the Piedmont

October 15th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Italian Reds from the Piedmont, for inclusion on our list. Bruce Magoon of Baker Distributing, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Piedmont, Italy’s westernmost region with borders on Switzerland and France, is hemmed in by the Alps and the Apennines, which explain why its name means "foot of the mountain. The climate is rigid by Italian standards, with distinct changes of season. Winters are cold with plenty of snow. Summers are for the most part hot and dry. Spring and fall are temperate to cool with fog normal at harvest time. But the most dramatic progress in the Asti and Alba areas has come with the ubiquitous Barbera, which after ages of being considered rather common has rapidly taken on aristocratic airs. The Barbera grape is the most widely planted variety in all of the Piedmont and makes a juicy, muscular red wine that is not as tannic as Barolo and Barbaresco. It is grown in nearly every major wine making region of the Piedmont but seems to do best near the towns of Alba and Asti. All types of red wine are made by growing and processing red (or black) grapes. The wine that is the end result will vary greatly, depending not only upon the type of grape grown, but several other factors. These factors include in which country and region the grapes are grown, how the climate, temperature, rain amount, and soil conditions affect the grapes during their growing season, and how each individual wine maker treats the grapes once they are harvested (picked). The best types of red wine are those in which all these factors come together perfectly to make a beautifully balanced, delicious wine. Most red wine grapes produce a more complex wine than white wines grapes. This is because red wine grapes stay on the vine longer due to their longer growing seasons in warmer climates. It’s also because the skins of red wine grapes remain in contact with their juice, giving red wine its color, tannin and flavor. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Castello Gabiano, “Labraja”, Barbera d’Asti 2010
Renato Ratti, “Colombè”, Dolcetto d’Alba 2012
Pertinance, Nebbiolo Langhe 2010
Terre del Barola, Barolo 2009
Pertinance, Barbaresco 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Columbia Valley Syrah

October 18th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Columbia Valley Syrah, for inclusion on our list. Think about the greatest floods ever documented on Earth—about a wave 500 feet high bursting through the ruptured ice dam of Glacial Lake Missoula, sweeping south across Eastern Washington at 50 miles an hour. Think about the brunt of 2,500 cubic kilometers of water rushing with a flow 10 times greater than the combined flow of all the rivers in the world, scouring the land to its bedrock bones—not just once, but as many as 90 times, as the ice dam repeatedly formed and failed, over intervals of 35 to 55 years, beginning some 15,300 years ago—creating an enormously complex geological riddle and hundreds of publication topics for scores of geologists since J Harlen Bretz first realized how the tortured landscape of the Channeled Scablands was formed. The prevailing southwesterly winds, which still prevail and still continue the geologic process, lifted the glacial sediments, the loess deposited by the floods, carrying it back north, distributing it approximately along the floods’ path, relinquishing finally what remained as the thick loess dunes of the Palouse. This windblown silt deposited over the underlying volcanic basalt, layered with the ash of intermittent eruptions of Northwest volcanoes from Mazama to St. Helens—this is the literal grounding of Eastern Washington’s terroir. Washington’s wine regions mostly lie in the flat, rural, southeastern part of the state (the miniscule Puget Sound appellation, with a mere 80 acres of vineyards, is the lone exception). The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. Other AVAs are much smaller—for instance, Red Mountain, an up- and-coming source for some of the state’s best Cabernet Sauvignons and Merlots, covers just 4,040 acres. Syrah forms intense wines, with deep violet, nearly black color, chewy texture and richness, and often alcoholic strength, with aromas that tend to be more spicy than fruity. Washington’s Syrahs often have a peppery gaminess that recalls France’s northern Rhône instead of the sweet, dense fruit that warmer climates give. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Columbia Crest, “Grand Estates”, Columbia Valley 2011
Genesis, Columbia Valley 2009
Charles Smith Wines, “Boom Boom”, Washington State 2013
Reininger, “Helix”, Columbia Valley 2009
K Vintners, “Milbrandt”, Wahluke Slope, Walla Walla 2012

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Spanish Red Wines rated 90+ points

October 22nd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Spanish Red Wines rated 90+ points, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. With nearly 1.16 million hectares under vine (of which 97.4% is for wine) Spain continues to be the country with the largest area of vine cultivation in the European Union and the world (it accounts for 30% of the total EU area, followed by France and Italy with approximately 22% each). Spain’s geographical position, its climatic differences and its wide variety of soil types makes it a privileged place for producing wines with very different characteristics. Vines are grown in all 17 of the country’s autonomous regions, even though nearly half of the total acreage is found in Castilla-La Mancha (540,000 ha) which is the geographical region with the largest area under vine cultivation in the world. It is unclear precisely where vines were first cultivated in Spain or who brought winemaking techniques to the Iberian peninsula. Various sources believe the first vineyards were cultivated on the southwest coast of Andalusia, which may also have been the entrance point for the first vines reaching the peninsula. Given the presence of the Phoenicians there approximately 3,000 years ago. They were a trading culture and founded a port in the southwest, which they called Gadir (now Cádiz). Later they moved inland, founding another city they called Xera (now Jerez), where they planted vines in the surrounding hills. Spanish winemaking really took off after the Reconquest of Spain by the Catholic Kings. The re-established religious communities and monasteries played a significant role in this process; the monks and friars of various orders worked to recover the winemaking tradition. Wine was vital for their religious rituals, and they also filled their cellars, supplying wine to pilgrims and local taverns. Thus, the vineyards flourished once again in areas surrounding the monasteries and abbeys, and later in other regions. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Castaño, “Vino Tinto”, Monastrell, Yecla 2013
Rio Madre, Graciano, Rioja 2012
Castaño, “Hécula”, Monastrell, Yecla 2011
Creta Roble, 100% Tempranillo, Ribera del Duero 2010
Porrera, “Black Slate”, Priorat 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of French Beaujolais

October 25th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of French Beaujolais, for inclusion on our list. The Gamay grape, more accurately known as Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc, is the most widely planted grape in Beaujolais accounting for nearly 98% of all plantings. Basic Beaujolais and Beaujolais nouveau are meant to be drunk within a year of their harvest. Beaujolais-Villages are generally consumed within 2–3 years and Cru Beaujolais has the potential to age longer, some not even fully developing till at least 3 years after harvest. Premium examples from Chénas, Juliénas, Morgon and Moulin-à-Vent can spend up to 10 years continuing to develop in the bottle and in very good vintages can take on Burgundian qualities of structure and complexity. Cru Beaujolais, the highest category of classification in Beaujolais, account for the production within ten villages/areas in the foothills of the Beaujolais mountains. Unlike Burgundy and Alsace, the phrase cru in Beaujolais refers to entire wine producing area rather than an individual vineyard. Seven of the Crus relate to actual villages while Brouilly and Côte de Brouilly refer to the vineyards areas around Mont Brouilly and Moulin-à-Vent is named for a local windmill. These wines do not usually show the word "Beaujolais" on the label, in an attempt to separate themselves from mass-produced Nouveau; in fact vineyards in the cru villages are not allowed to produce Nouveau. Their wines can be more full-bodied, darker in color, and significantly longer-lived. From north to south the Beaujolais crus are- Saint-Amour, Juliénas, Chénas, Moulin-à-Vent, Fleurie, Chiroubles, Morgon, Régnié, Brouilly and Côte de Brouilly.
The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Stéphane Aviron, Beaujolais Villages 2011
Jean Paul DuBost, “Tracot”, Beaujolais Villages 2013
Georges Duboeuf, “La TrinQuée”, Juliénas 2011
Domaine de la Chappelle des Bois, Chiroubles 2012
Château des Jacques, Moulin-A-Vent, 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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