Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of South African Cabernet Sauvignon

May 3rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

 We will be tasting new releases of South African Cabernet Sauvignon, for inclusion on our list. The establishment by the Dutch East India Company of a refreshment station at the Cape in 1652 had one single aim: to provide fresh food to the company's merchant fleet on their voyages to India and surrounding areas. Jan van Riebeeck, the first governor of the Cape, planted a vineyard in 1655, and on 2 February 1659, the first wine was made from Cape grapes. Van Riebeeck strongly encouraged farmers to plant vineyards although initially they were most reluctant. There were many setbacks in the beginning, chiefly because of the farmers' ignorance of viticulture. Things improved when Van Riebeeck was succeeded in 1679 by Simon van der Stel, who was not only enthusiastic but very knowledgeable about viticulture and winemaking. He planted a vineyard on his farm Constantia and made good wine from the outset. The Dutch had almost no wine tradition and it was only after the French Huguenots settled at the Cape between 1680 and 1690 that the wine industry began to flourish. Most of the Cape’s winegrowing regions are influenced by one of the two mighty oceans which meet at this southernmost tip of Africa: the Atlantic and the Indian oceans. Combine beneficial maritime influences like regular coastal fog and cooling sea breezes with a moderate Mediterranean climate, distinctive and varied topography, and diverse soils, and you have the ideal conditions in which to create wines of unique character and complexity. Since the end of apartheid, the South African wine industry has been working to reestablish itself in the world's wine markets with many regions actively promoting their Cabernet Sauvignon. Today it is the most widely planted red wine grape in South Africa. As the vines age, and better vineyards locations are identified, regional styles are starting to emerge among South African Cabernet Sauvignons: the Stellenbosch region is noted for heavy, full bodied wines while Constantia's wines are characterized by their herbal and minty flavors. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Excelsior, Robertson 2011
Robertson Winery, Robertson 2012
House of Mandela, Western Cape 2012
Graham Beck, “The Game Reserve”, Western Cape 2010
Stark-Condé, Stellenbosch 2011

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Shiraz

May 7th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Shiraz, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Hardys, “Wine Box”, Southeastern Australia 2012
Henry’s Drive Vignerons, “Morse Code”, South Australia 2011
The Lucky Country, McLaren Vale 2012
Mitolo, “Jester”, McLaren Vale 2010
Mollydooker, “The Boxer”, South Australia 2012

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of California Petit Sirah

May 10th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of California Petit Sirah, for inclusion on our list. Petite Sirah is a variety with many fans among consumers. Originally cultivated and labeled as Petite Sirah only in California, its origin was unknown and identification uncertain and could only be speculated upon, until late in 2003. DNA evidence from research led by Dr. Carole Meredith at the University of California at Davis has confirmed most plantings to be the same grape as Durif. About 10% however, is Peloursin, which, observed in the field, is practically indistinguishable from Durif, even by expert ampelographers. In the 1940s, Larkmead and Louis Martini sold wines labeled "Duriff" and plantings in McDowell Valley were documented in 1948. The fruit source for these wines was probably what later became known as Petite Sirah. Most plantings of Petite Sirah were made before the 1960s, when vintners were mainly concerned with producing copious amounts of flavorful blends of generic "Burgundy". Wines that showed varietal identity were of little consequence. Field-blending was the norm during this time, with many varieties often interplanted. As a result, few vineyards identified as Petite Sirah are "pure". Vineyard blocks are often peppered with vines of Alicante Bouschet, Carignan, Grenache, Mourvedre, the aforementioned Peloursin, or Zinfandel. The reality therefore is that wines from these vineyards labeled "Petite Sirah" to at least some degree are blends, accidentally if not purposefully. California plantings have increased to over 6,000 acres now and as many as sixty wineries today produce varietal Petite Sirahs for fans and followers. Petite Sirah has long been an important blending grape, prized primarily for its deep color and fairly intense tannin. It is the variety most often chosen to blend into zinfandel for added complexity, body, and to tone down the tendency of zins toward "jammy" fruit. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

McManis Family Vineyards, California 2012
Three 3, Contra Costa County, 2010
J.Lohr, “Tower Road”, Paso Robles 2011
Marietta, Alexander Valley, 2009
Ridge, “Lytton Estate” 2011

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Argentine Cabernet Sauvignon

May 15th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Argentine Cabernet Sauvignon, for inclusion on our list. Robert Boehme of Vermont Wine Merchants Company will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Argentina is currently the world's fifth largest wine producer by volume – after France, Italy, Spain and the USA in that order – a position it has held for many years. High volume, low quality vines are being replaced by premium varieties. Formerly struggling bodegas are attracting the backing of major international wine companies. Product quality is soaring, and every year the industry balance shifts further from cheap table wines towards exquisitely crafted wines that are increasingly recognised as being amongst the best in the world. The Argentine wine industry is reaping the benefits of its heritage - old vines, unique geographical conditions - with new technology and a mix of modern and traditional methods. It's come along way since the first vines were planted in Mendoza more than 400 years ago. The reason for this was that the indigenous Huarpes of the region had, many years earlier, developed and built a complex and sophisticated system of irrigation channels to bring water from the Mendoza river to the arid plains. The desert climate and advanced irrigation system gives Mendoza's grape growers a unique advantage. With complete control over the watering of their vines, and in combination with the hot daytime temperatures and cool nights during the grape ripening seasons, conditions are almost ideal for growing grapes with ripe, intense fruit characteristics and good acidity levels. Cabernet Sauvignon fares best in warmer climates, and benefits from a long ripening season. In Argentina Cabernet Sauvignon is usually picked towards the end of the harvest, in late March. A small, robust, thick and dark-skinned grape, it imparts considerable tannins, body, and colour to its wines. Aromas and flavours most often ascribed to Cabernet Sauvignon are black fruit – blackberries and blackcurrants. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Barricas, Mendoza 2012
Bodegas Salentein, “Portillo”, Mendoza 2012
Crios, Mendoza 2011
Domaine Bousquet, Tupungato Valley 2012
Familia Bonfanti, Mendoza 2008

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of New Zealand Pinot Noir

May 21st 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of New Zealand Pinot Noir, for inclusion on our list. Stuart Timmons of Farrell Distribution will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. When the first Marlborough vines were planted in 1973 few people predicted that the region would become New Zealand's largest and best known winegrowing area in little more than 30 years. The distinctive pungency and zesty fruit flavours of the first wines captured the imagination of the country's winemakers and wine drinkers alike and sparked an unparalleled boom in vineyard development. Worldwide interest in Marlborough wines, particularly Sauvignon Blanc, has continued to fuel that regional wine boom. The free-draining, alluvial loams over gravelly subsoils in the Wairau and Awatere River valleys provides ideal growing conditions. Abundant sunshine with cool nights and a long growing season helps to build and maintain the vibrant fruit flavours for which Marlborough is now famous. Sauvignon Blanc is the most planted grape variety with Chardonnay in second place, followed by Pinot Noir and Riesling. The silty alluvial soils and long, cool ripening conditions in the South Island regions of Marlborough and Nelson produce vibrant, fruit-focused Pinot Noir with strong cherry and plum flavours. With its rich flavours and soft tannins New Zealand Pinot Noir suits a wide range of dishes. Lean meats, such as veal, venison or turkey, are a good match with Pinot Noir. The vibrant cherry flavours of Pinot Noir from the more Southern New Zealand regions flatter the flavours of turkey like the classic garnish, cranberry sauce. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Matua, Marborough 2012
Brancott Estate, Marborough 2011
Whitehaven, Marborough 2007
Yealands, Marborough/Central Otago 2010
Tohu, “Single Vineyard”, Marborough 2010

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

 

Wine Tasting - New Releases of French Corbières

May 24th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of French Corbières, for inclusion on our list. The Corbières have been known in the past for cheap, uncomplicated red wine produced in vast quantities to quench the thirst of northern France. However, over the past twenty years things have been quietly changing. The producers have organised themselves and attained Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC) status, and adopted new technology while still retaining the best of their old traditions; poor quality vines have been pulled up and replaced with better ones. Some of the very best wines, by their nature, are produced in small quantities and it is rare to find them outside the region of production. Yet at the same time, compared to better known wine regions, prices are still very reasonable. The AOC was created in 1985, covers 13,500 hectares (33,000 acres) of vineyards and produces an average of 554 000 hectoliter of wine per year, corresponding to 74 million bottles. Due to its size and geography, Corbières encompasses an enormous variety of soil types and microclimates. The wines from the region tend to be just as varied as the terroir. The region also experiences widely varied winds. The dry, Atlantic vent Cers frequently brings cold weather from the northwest while the area is normally under the influence of the warm, Mediterranean vent Marin. The vast majority (80%) of Corbières wine is red, with the remainder equally split between white and rosé. Red wines are generally full-bodied and spicy; rosés range from deep pink to the palest of tints, uncomplicated and fresh-flavoured. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Castel Maure, “La Buvette”, Vin de France NV
Château Trillol, Grenache/Syrah 2008
Domaine de Fontsainte, “Reserve La Demoiselle” 2009
Domaine Faillenc, “Sainte Marie” 2009
Maxime Morgan, “Rozeta” 2012

A sign-up sheet will be available at the front desk (253-5742 or 800-826-7000) and there will be a $20.00 fee per person.

 

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