Trapp Wine Tasting, Always a Great Vintage

We have weekly wine tastings in our wine cellar with varieties from all around the world. The format is casual with cheese and bread. Our Wine Cellar is also available for intimate, private dinner parties.

Upcoming Events

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Tuscan Chianti

September 3rd 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Tuscan Chianti, for inclusion on our list. Bruce Magoon of Baker Distributing, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The first definition of a wine-area called Chianti was made in 1716. It described the area near the villages of Gaiole, Castellina and Radda; the so-called Lega del Chianti and later Provincia del Chianti (Chianti province). In 1932 the Chianti area was completely re-drawn and divided in seven sub-areas: Classico, Colli Aretini, Colli Fiorentini, Colline Pisane, Colli Senesi, Montalbano and Rùfina. Most of the villages that in 1932 were suddenly included in the new Chianti Classico area added in Chianti to their name-such as Greve in Chianti which amended its name in 1972. Wines labeled Chianti Classico come from the biggest sub-area of Chianti, that sub-area that includes the old Chianti area. During the 1970s producers started to reduce the quantity of white grapes in Chianti. In 1995 it became legal to produce a Chianti with 100% Sangiovese. For a wine to retain the name of Chianti, it must be produced with at least 80% Sangiovese grapes. Since 1996 the blend for Chianti and Chianti Classico has been 75-100% Sangiovese, up to 10% Canaiolo and up to 20% of any other approved red grape variety such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or Syrah. Since 2006, the use of white grape varieties such as Malvasia and Trebbiano have been prohibited in Chianti Classico. Aged Chianti (38 months instead of 4-7), may be labelled as Riserva. Chianti that meets more stringent requirements (lower yield, higher alcohol content and dry extract) may be labelled as Chianti Superiore, although Chianti from the "Classico" sub-area is not allowed in any event to be labelled as "Superiore". Chianti is a very dry red wine that, like most Italian wines, tastes best with food. It ranges from light-bodied to almost full-bodied, according to the district, producer, vintage, and aging regime. It often has an aroma of cherries and sometimes violets, and has a flavor reminiscent of tart cherries. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Tomaiolo, “Riserva” 2010
Melini, “Riserva” 2010
Ruffino, “Superiore” 2012
Banfi, “Classico Riserva” 2010
Antinori, “Pèppoli Classico” 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Loire Cabernet Francs

September 6th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Loire Cabernet Francs, for inclusion on our list. The Loire is the longest river in France, the last wild river in Europe, and has been designated a World Heritage area by UNESCO. For much of its 630 miles - from the mountains of central France to the coast of Brittany - the Loire is vineyard country. Total wine production makes up the third largest AOC (appellation d'origine contrôlée) viticultural area in France. It is France’s second largest region for sparkling wine and the leading region for white wine production. The Loire River is the cradle of the French Nation. It is where the cultures of north and south meet. Charles Martel stopped the Saracen invasion of Europe at Tours in 731 AD. Joan of Arc met the Dauphin at Chinon in 1429 and convinced him to fight the English. Loire Valley wines include 65 appellations that include every style of wine – red, white, rosé, still, Sparkling, sweet, dry and everything in between. One reason for this diversity is the size of the Loire Valley. The vineyards grow along a 300 mile stretch of the river, so there are several distinct climates and a wide variety of soils that divide the Loire Valley into 5 distinct regions, each with its own characteristic varietals and wine styles. The red wines of the Loire Valley range from fresh and fruity to rich and earthy, but they are never overpowering. The lighter ones can be served chilled at a summer barbecue, and the fuller bodied are excellent for companions for hearty dishes. Cabernet Franc ripens earlier than its more famous cousin (Cabernet Sauvignon), making it better suited to the cooler climate of the Loire. It probably originated in Bordeaux, where it is mainly used for blending, but it is so well suited to conditions in the Loire Valley that it stands alone in such famous wines as Chinon, Bourgueil and Samur-Champigny. Fine old Cabernet Franc wines can, in the words of one Loire Valley winemaker, be reminiscent of the aromas of a forest after a rainstorm. Young Cabernet Franc is an ideal red wine for summer. Older, bigger wines are delicious with roasted meats and are probably the ideal accompaniment to the traditional roast leg of lamb with flageolet beans. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Domaine de la Colline, Chinon 2011
Le Grand Bouqueyeau, “Reserve”, Chinon 2011
Domaine Nau, “Les Bloltières”, Bourgueil 2011
Domaine de la Chevalerie, “Galichets”, Bourgueil 2010
Catherine et Pierre Breton, “La Dilettanté”,Bourgueil 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Columbia Valley Bordeaux Style Reds

September 10th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Columbia Valley Bordeaux Style Reds, for inclusion on our list. John Fagan of Calmont Beverage, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Think about the greatest floods ever documented on Earth—about a wave 500 feet high bursting through the ruptured ice dam of Glacial Lake Missoula, sweeping south across Eastern Washington at 50 miles an hour. Think about the brunt of 2,500 cubic kilometers of water rushing with a flow 10 times greater than the combined flow of all the rivers in the world, scouring the land to its bedrock bones—not just once, but as many as 90 times, as the ice dam repeatedly formed and failed, over intervals of 35 to 55 years, beginning some 15,300 years ago—creating an enormously complex geological riddle and hundreds of publication topics for scores of geologists since J Harlen Bretz first realized how the tortured landscape of the Channeled Scablands was formed. The prevailing southwesterly winds, which still prevail and still continue the geologic process, lifted the glacial sediments, the loess deposited by the floods, carrying it back north, distributing it approximately along the floods’ path, relinquishing finally what remained as the thick loess dunes of the Palouse. This windblown silt deposited over the underlying volcanic basalt, layered with the ash of intermittent eruptions of Northwest volcanoes from Mazama to St. Helens—this is the literal grounding of Eastern Washington’s terroir. Washington’s wine regions mostly lie in the flat, rural, southeastern part of the state (the miniscule Puget Sound appellation, with a mere 80 acres of vineyards, is the lone exception). The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. The largest by far is the Columbia Valley AVA (American Viticultural Area), which covers almost 11 million acres, nearly a third of the state. Other AVAs are much smaller—for instance, Red Mountain, an up- and-coming source for some of the state’s best Cabernet Sauvignons and Merlots, covers just 4,040 acres. At its most basic, vintners blend wine made from different grapes in order to add more complexity to the flavor and texture of a wine. Both reds and whites can be made from blends of varietals. In some cases, they may even blend whites and reds together in order to create the best possible combination of aromas and flavors. Some wine blends are made from classic recipes handed down from generation to generation. Other vintners create brand new blends in an attempt to produce a new and exciting wine that has flavor characteristics like nothing else on the market. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Renegade Wine Co., “Red Wine” 2012
Corvidae Wine Co., “Rook” 2011
Helix by Reininger, “Pomatia” 2010
Sleight of Hand Cellars, “The Spellbinder” 2012
Fall Line Winery, “Exhibition”, Yakima Valley 2011

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Right Bank Bordeaux’s

September 13th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Right Bank Bordeaux’s, for inclusion on our list. A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Average vintages produce over 700 million bottles of Bordeaux wine, ranging from large quantities of everyday table wine, to some of the most expensive and prestigious wines in the world. Red Bordeaux, is generally made from a blend of grapes. Permitted grapes are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Malbec and Carménère. Today Malbec and Carménère are rarely used, with Château Clerc Milon, a fifth growth Bordeaux, being one of the few to still retain the Carménère vine. Bordeaux wine is made by more than 8,500 producers or Château. There are 60 appellations of Bordeaux wine. In Bordeaux the concept of terroir plays a pivotal role in wine production with the top estates aiming to make terroir driven wines that reflect the place they are from, often from grapes collected from a single vineyard. The Gironde River and its tributaries, the Dordogne and Garonne, divide the Bordeaux region creating two distinct wine production zones - the Left Bank and the Right Bank. These two banks differ mainly in soil composition. On the Right Bank, clay, limestone and sand prevail, all of which are more suited to Merlot. On the Left Bank, gravel predominates, allowing Cabernet Sauvignon to thrive. The Merlot-based wines of the Right Bank are generally more fruit forward and have less tannin than those of the Left Bank. The Right Bank consists of two major regions: Saint-Emilion and Pomerol. Saint-Emilion contains over 900 individual producers. A blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc produces wines that are less tannic, softer, and more forward than those of the Left Bank. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Château Beausejour, “Pentimento”, Montagne-Saint Èmilion 2010
Château Fleur de Jean Gué, Lalande de Pomerol 2011
Clos du Roy, Fronsac 2010
Les Cadrans de Lassègue, Saint-Èmilion 2011
Château Rocher Corbin, Montagne-Saint Èmilion 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Australian Shiraz

September 18th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Australian Shiraz, for inclusion on our list. Robert Boehme of Vermont Wine Merchants Company will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. Vine cuttings from the Cape of Good Hope were brought to the penal colony of New South Wales by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet (1788). An attempt at wine making from these first vines failed, but with perseverance, other settlers managed to successfully cultivate vines for winemaking, and Australian made wine was available for sale domestically by the 1820s. In 1822 Gregory Blaxland became the first person to export Australian wine, and was the first winemaker to win an overseas award. So, much of Australia’s first century and a half was built on turning Shiraz, Grenache and Mourvedre (Mataro) into fortified wines and Muscadelle into Muscat. Winemakers used basket presses to maximise fruit structure and body – and they understood barrel maturation. Australia is blessed with plenty of sunshine enabling their grapes to ripen to perfection. Whatever the requirements of a particular red wine varietal, there are parts of Australia that can give it everything it needs. The aromas and flavours of Shiraz vary with wine style and region, but are usually blackberry, plums, and pepper in varying degrees dependent on growing conditions. In addition, even more regionally based, we can find liquorice, tar even, and bitter chocolate and mocha. Climate affects these with the warmer climates providing the plums and chocolate (Barossa) and the cooler climates giving more of the pepper (Victoria). The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

The Lackey Wines, “The Lackey”, South Australia 2012
Plantagenet, “Hazard Hill”, Western Australia 2010
Hope Estate, “The Ripper”, Western Australia 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Footbolt”, McLaren Vale 2010
d’Arenberg, “The Laughing Magpie”, Shiraz / Viognier, McLaren Vale 2009

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of French Languedoc Reds

September 25th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of French Languedoc Reds, for inclusion on our list. Anthony Wagner of G. Housen, will be on hand to discuss the wines and answer any questions. The region of Languedoc has belonged to France since the thirteenth century and the Roussillon was acquired from Spain in the mid-seventeenth century. The two regions were joined as one administrative region in the late 1980s. The Languedoc-Roussillon is the world’s largest wine-producing region. Languedoc’s wine production exceeds that of Bordeaux, of Australia, and that of South Africa and Chile combined Languedoc-Roussillon’s wine represents a third of the volume of all French output (in 2006, the region produced 15,750,000 hectolitres of wine, which accounted for 34 per cent of total French output). Today, Languedoc-Roussillon’s wine production is all about quality rather than quantity: in just under 20 years, Languedoc has actively reduced its production from an annual average of 29 million hectolitres to 16 million. There are some thirty appellations and crus included within the Languedoc-Roussillon region, with roughly 2,800 producers in Languedoc-Roussillon; between them, they make around two billion bottles of wine a year. Wine has been made in this region for at least 2,600 years, ever since the ancient Greeks founded the city of Marseille in 600 BC. Throughout the region's history, viticulture and winemaking have been influenced by the cultures that have been present in Provence, which include the Ancient Greeks, Romans, Gauls, Catalans and Savoyards. These diverse groups introduced a large variety of grapes to the region, including grape varieties of Greek and Roman origin as well as Spanish, Italian and traditional French wine grapes. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Le Petit Saint-Jacques, Pays d’Oc, 50% Cabernet/50% Grenache 2010
Château de Lascaux, 60% Syrah, 30% Grenache & 10% Mourvedre 2012
Château de Lascaux, “Carra”, Pic Saint-Loup 2011
Laguzell, Minervous 2013
Domaine Leon Barral, Faugères 2010

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

Wine Tasting - New Releases of Puglia Negroamaro Reds

September 27th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

We will be tasting new releases of Puglia Negroamaro Reds, for inclusion on our list. Puglia has always been the engine-room of Italian wine production. This region is hot and flat, but that is mitigated by constant sea breezes - especially from both sides of the southerly Salento peninsula - and long-established bush vines offer some resistance to drought. In truth, much of the regions's massive grape production was from high-yielding vineyards sited on the baking plains, the fruit destined for distillation or to be sold off cheaply in bulk. But many in the Puglian wine industry have realised that contributing cheap wine for distillation or to help fill the European wine lake was a flawed strategy. There is a new emphasis on quality throughout Puglia's regions, and both DOC and IGT appellations are attempting to up their game to compete with bottled wines on a world stage. Negroamaro is king here, making robust reds and fragrant rosés especially in the south, whilst Primitivo is probably the most recognised grape, thanks to its close genetic twin, the Zinfandel of California. Nero di Troia is the third of the big Puglian red wine varieties, with pockets of Aglianico (much more popular in the neighbouring Campania and Basilatica provinces) as well as Montepulciano and Malvasia Nero. Negroamaro, is a red wine grape variety native to southern Italy. It is grown almost exclusively in Puglia and particularly in Salento, the peninsula which can be visualised as the “heel” of Italy. The grape can produce wines very deep in color. Wines made from Negroamaro tend to be very rustic in character, combining perfume with an earthy bitterness. The grape produces some of the best red wines of Puglia, particularly when blended with the highly scented Malvasia Nera, as in the case of Salice Salentino. The format will be casual, walk around with cheese and bread. The wines featured will be:

Sule, Salento, Negroamaro 2011
Cantele, Salice Salentino, “Rosso Reserva”, 100% Negroamaro 2012
Vino Biologico, “Terre Nova”, Salice Salentino Rosso 2012
Apollonia, “Rosso”, Salice Salentino, 80% Negroamaro / 20% Malvasia Nera 2008
Apollonia, “Copertino”, 70% Negroamaro, 20% Montepuliciano & 10% Malvasia Nera 2007

Reservations required; please call the front desk at (802) 253-5742 or (800) 826-7000.

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